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GulfDataAtlas/usSEABED_DominantSediments (MapServer)

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Service Description: This map provides a summary of bottom types and bottom habitats in the Gulf of Mexico. The sediment characteristics are described as follows: if the most abundant of the seabed-sized fractions of rock, gravel, sand, or mud is >66%, then it is said to be dominant. If the most abundant of these is >33%, then it is subdominant. If one of the four—rock, gravel, sand, or mud—is the more dominant in an area, then strong control is exerted over the types of organisms (benthos) that live on the ocean floor. Rock and gravel provide microhabitats for organisms and favor attached epibenthos (e.g., suspension feeders). However, rock is more stable. Sand is the most mobile of substrates and encourages vagrant and active burrowing forms. Mud is usually stable on the scale of burrows because of its cohesiveness and favors infauna. It also tends to have the highest organic carbon contents. The data for this analysis comes from USGS's usSEABED.

Map Name: Seafloor Substrates - Dominant Sediments

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Layers: Description: This map provides a summary of bottom types and bottom habitats in the Gulf of Mexico. The sediment characteristics are described as follows: if the most abundant of the seabed-sized fractions of rock, gravel, sand, or mud is >66%, then it is said to be dominant. If the most abundant of these is >33%, then it is subdominant. If one of the four—rock, gravel, sand, or mud—is the more dominant in an area, then strong control is exerted over the types of organisms (benthos) that live on the ocean floor. Rock and gravel provide microhabitats for organisms and favor attached epibenthos (e.g., suspension feeders). However, rock is more stable. Sand is the most mobile of substrates and encourages vagrant and active burrowing forms. Mud is usually stable on the scale of burrows because of its cohesiveness and favors infauna. It also tends to have the highest organic carbon contents.

Copyright Text: Chris Jenkins, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado at Boulder

Spatial Reference: 102100  (3857)


Single Fused Map Cache: false

Initial Extent: Full Extent: Units: esriMeters

Supported Image Format Types: PNG32,PNG24,PNG,JPG,DIB,TIFF,EMF,PS,PDF,GIF,SVG,SVGZ,BMP

Document Info: Supports Dynamic Layers: true

MaxRecordCount: 1000

MaxImageHeight: 4096

MaxImageWidth: 4096

Supported Query Formats: JSON, geoJSON

Supports Query Data Elements:

Min Scale: 0

Max Scale: 0

Supports Datum Transformation: true



Child Resources:   Info   Dynamic Layer

Supported Operations:   Export Map   Identify   QueryDomains   QueryLegends   Find   Return Updates   Generate KML